VCE Visual Comminications

Unit 2: Applications of visual communication design

Outcome 1: Technical drawing in context

Curriculum

Key knowledge

  • two-dimensional drawing methods such as plans and elevations (environmental)
  • third-angle orthogonal projections and packaging nets (industrial)
  • technical drawing conventions used with presentation drawings such as those related to layout, dimensions, labels, symbols and lines
  • role of Australian Standards in providing nationally accepted conventions for technical drawing
  • methods of drawing to scale using conventional ratios such as:
    • 1:50, 1:100, 1:25 (environmental)
    • 1:1, 2:1, 1:5 or 1:10 (industrial).

Key skills

  • use manual and digital methods to create presentation drawings
  • select and apply technical drawing conventions used with presentation drawings appropriate to the selected field
  • select and apply two- and three-dimensional methods to represent form, proportions and scale.

Digital tools

SketchUp

Google SketchUp
Available on eduSTAR www.edustar.vic.edu.au

Why

  • SketchUp allows students to accurately trace their manual drawing, work to scale and add dimensions following Australian standards.

Lesson plan

Key knowledge

  • two-dimensional drawing methods such as plans and elevations (environmental)
  • third-angle orthogonal projections and packaging nets (industrial)
  • technical drawing conventions used with presentation drawings such as those related to layout, dimensions, labels, symbols and lines
  • methods of drawing to scale using conventional ratios such as:
    • 1:50, 1:100, 1:25 (environmental)
    • 1:1, 2:1, 1:5 or 1:10 (industrial).

Key skills

  • use manual and digital methods to create presentation drawings
  • select and apply technical drawing conventions used with presentation drawings
  • select and apply two- and three-dimensional methods to represent form, proportions and scale.

Learning intention

Create a visual communication presentation in the environmental design field using digital technologies and applying the Australian standard conventions. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of both manual and digital methods used in relation to the purpose of this Visual communication.

Description

Students will:

  • design the floor plan of a house in response to a brief using manual freehand drawing to generate ideas.
  • scan, import, scale and trace the drawing in SketchUp and apply dimensions to architectural standards.
  • print the floor plan without dimensions and generate a range of elevations to a scale of 1:100.
  • create the house in SketchUp based on their selected elevation.
  • They can import textures from the internet www.cgtextures.com to expand their materials palette and render the house using the materials palette and apply shadows for final presentation.

How will digital technologies be integrated into this lesson?

  • Students use SketchUp to create their house.
  • Task sheets and advice are shared with students on a password protected school website. A Global2 blog [link tohttp://global2.vic.edu.au/] could also be used. Students scan their manual drawings to import to SketchUp.

Why

  • SketchUp allows students to accurately trace their manual drawing, work to scale and add dimensions following Australian standards.
  • An online space (website or blog) allows students easy access to support materials at school and home.
  • The scanner allows students to turn their manual drawing into a digital format, which they can trace.

Preparation

Lesson procedure

  1. Students scan their selected floor plan drawing; email it to themselves and save it as a PNG file.
  2. Open SketchUp and select the architecture template in millimetres. Scale the drawing up using, using the measuring tape to work in a scale of 1:100.
  3. Open a new document and import by selecting PNG in the file format in SketchUp. Place the scanned floor plan on the origin point where the three axes meet.
  4. Go to ‘View’ in the main title bar then select ‘tool palettes’ and choose ‘large tool palette’ which will appear on the left hand side of the screen. Select the scale tool and enlarge your floor plan using the figure as a rough guide. Then select the measuring tape and measure one of the rooms to see if it is the correct size.
  5. Using the shape, arc and pencil tools create an outline of the exterior shape of the floor plan. Delete all the lines inside using the selection tool and delete button.
  6. Select the offset tool, click once and then type in the measurement 300, numbers only and then hit return. An exterior wall will appear around the entire shape of the floor plan.
  7. The floor space can be deleted with the selection button and delete key so that the manual drawing underneath is visible. It will need to be deleted every time an interior wall is drawn. Interior walls are drawn with the rectangle tool, typing in 100 as the width measurement. The pencil tool and measuring tape can also be used with the measuring tape marking out the 100 mm space and then the pencil tool adding the lines.
  8. When all the interior walls are drawn, delete all the small lines between the interior and exterior walls.
  9. Refer to page 20 of the VCAA specifications handbook to ensure you are following Australian specifications. Technical Drawing Specifications (pdf - 1.62mb)
  10. Go to ‘Window’ in the top bar and select ‘Model info’. Under ‘units’ make sure the precision is at 0mm and untick ‘display units format’. Then go to ‘dimensions’, change the font to “gill sans’, then change the endpoints under leader lines to ‘slash’ and tick the align to the dimension line, checking that it is on the outside.
  11. With the dimension tool properly set up, click along the dotted lines left by the measuring tape to the appropriate distances as specified in your handbook.
  12. Complete all three rows of measurements on all four sides of your floor plan.
  13. Go to ‘edit’ on the top bar and click ‘delete guides’, which will make all the dashed lines disappear.
  14. Go to ‘view’ and untick ‘axes’ which will remove the three axes lines.
  15. Go to ‘window’ and select ‘styles’. Under default styles, select straight lines and choose the first box.
  16. Under ‘file’ choose ‘export’ and select .jpeg and change the title of your work to ‘floor plan measurements’ and save to an appropriate folder.

Further Information

Student work

Earthship is a house that is self-sustainable. Christina had the students use earthships as a theme in their houses to introduce ideas of sustainability.

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