NPDL Citizenship

Unpacking Citizenship in the Classroom

Use this excerpt from the 21CLD, Australian Implementation Toolkit with your staff to discuss what citizenship looks like in the classroom.

Real-World Innovation and Problem Solving - In a world characterised by exponential change and complex challenge, it is essential for learners to develop dynamic, innovative mind-frames and capabilities that enable them to continually adapt, create the ‘new’ and actively contribute to making the world a better place for all.
Do learners work with real-world issues, opportunities challenges and problems for authentic audiences and benefits?
Yes No

Having identified classroom environment issues related to space, noise and storage that are impacting on learning and peer relationships, learners use the design-technology process to re-design their classroom to address these issues. Learner innovation and problem solving occurs in response to authentic learning issues and needs.

Learners rewrite a Shakespeare play for a teenage audience in another class in response to their feedback that Shakespeare lacks relevance in their lives. This is done to an authentic need and teenagers are a real, specific audience.

Air quality is identified as an issue in the classroom, and learners investigate whether growing plants in their classroom can improve this. The context for investigation represents a real issue.

Learners use the design-technology process to create plans for their ‘ideal’ classroom. These plans are not created in response to authentic needs or issues.

Learners rewrite a Shakepeare play in a new rhyme scheme. This has no specific audience.

Learners investigate the interaction between green plants and carbon dioxide in the air. There is no authentic need or explicit context for investigation.
Actively inquire and pose questions - Real world innovation and problem solving requires learners to actively inquire, pose, and pursue questions in order to understand and accurately identify authentic needs, issues, opportunities, challenges and problems.
Do learners actively inquire and pose questions?
Yes No

Having heard complaints from teenagers in another class about Shakespeare’s plays, learners interview members of this class about their teacher to uncover their concerns. They re-write a Shakespeare play for this audience in response to their feedback and key concern that Shakespeare lacks relevance in their lives. Learners listen to others’ perspectives to understand and accurately respond to their key concerns.

Air quality is identified as an issue in the classroom, and learners investigate whether growing plants in their classroom can improve this. As part of their inquiries, learners look at other work and learning places that have experienced similar issues to get an accurate understanding of the problem and ideas for addressing it. Learners inquire into similar contexts to help them understand the issues and discover potential solutions.

Students rewrite a Shakespeare play in a new rthyme scheme. Learners do not actively inquire and pose questions for an authentic audience or purpose.

Learners investigate the interaction between green plants and carbon dioxide in the air. Although learners may actively inquire and pose questions, there is no explicit purpose or real-world context for their investigation.

Generate possibilities, design and test out ideas and solutions - In this dimension, learners generate multiple possibilities, alternatives and solutions from which to create, design and test their ideas.
Do learners generate possibilities, design and test out ideas and solutions?
Yes No

Learners rewrite a Shakespeare play for a teenage audience in another class in response to their feedback that Shakespeare lacks relevance in their lives. As part of this, learners use Attribute Listing to generate the plays main characteristics and dimensions they might change, and brainstorm ways to make each of these more relevant to their audience’s lives. They test out ideas using key criteria identified from feedback.

Air quality is identified as an issue in the classroom, and using data and ideas gathered from their earlier inquiries, it seems that growing plants in their classroom may improve this. They decide to experiment and test out which plants will best achieve this, monitoring and recording their results.

Students rewrite a Shakespeare play in a new rhyme scheme.

Learners investigate the interaction between green plants and carbon dioxide in the air.
Do learners evaluate, reflect, and take action on their ideas? - Real world and innovation and problem solving is driven by authentic purpose: to make a difference that results in real and authentic benefits for specific audiences and situations.
Do learners evaluate, reflect and take action?
Yes No

Learners rewrite and perform a Shakespeare play for a teenage audience in another class in response to feedback that Shakespeare lacks relevance in their lives. They seek feedback from this audience to identify its value to them, and use this feedback to improve the play and perform it for a youth audience at their local community centre. Learners take their rewrite to action by performing the play for a specific audience and evaluate its benefits to make changes for another, broader authentic audience.

Following learners’ investigations, they develop a presentation using Community Clips and Windows Live Moviemaker about safe and responsible online behaviours for parents and peers to be aware of, and present their product at their school parent’s night. Parents and learners who attend the parent’s night presentation are an authentic audience for whom this has real-life benefits.

Learners analyse statistics on the basketball team’s past performance and create mathematical models using Microsoft Excel for the coach, to illustarte targeted improvement needs for both team and individual performance. The coach uses learners’ analysis to help players focus their training on skills that need improvement. This has real life benefits and value for the basketball coach and team members as they use data to take action.

Students rewrite a Shakespeare play in a new rhyme scheme. This has no specific audience or authentic action with real world benefits.

Following learners’ investigations, they develop a presentation using Community Clips and Windows Live Moviemaker about safe and reasponsible online behaviours for parents and students to be aware of. This is viewed and assessed by the teacher. This has no specific audience and is not taken to action for real life audience benefits.

Learners analyse data about the basketball team and use Microsoft Excel to graph performace patterns for the overall team and individual players. Learners graphs are presented to the class as an academic exercise. Learners do not take action on an authentic issue that exists.

Excerpt from 21CLD, Australian Implementation Toolkit, Microsoft, 2013

Previous Page | Next Page